More email newsletters

NYT says:

‘Email newsletters, an old-school artifact of the web that was supposed to die along with dial-up connections, are not only still around, but very much on the march.”

http://tinyurl.com/nvwujay

jer

new language annotation software

regarding a new release of ELAN, language annotation software from The Language Archive (TLA) sponsored by the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (to which i have absolutely NO affliliation):

 

by Han Sloetjes

Recently, we have released ELAN 4.7.1. It introduces some important changes to the EAF format (now version 2.8). The XML structure of controlled vocabularies is changed such that it breaks backward compatibility! Connected to these changes are new features such as multilingual controlled vocabularies and the fact that annotations now store a reference to the CV entry they are based on. Language assignment is now possible for controlled vocabularies but will be extended to the display of Metadata, Data Categories and tiers in future releases.

There is an option in the Preferences to always store in the previous version of EAF, version 2.7, for backward compatibility with previous ELAN releases. But using both ELAN 4.7.x and 4.6.2 or lower on the same files should be done with care.

Other new features are a media player based on VLC for Linux, an option for adding dependent tiers in multiple files, n-gram analysis for corpora and volume sliders for all linked audio tracks for convenient switching between the audio sources.

and a link to the download site here

 

Software, Culture, and Political Economy in New Media Capitalism

Here’s a link to the book of the title of this post – a book about social media, the software that it uses, and the uses of that software.

there’s a free chapter to download at the site, so perhaps worth taking a look.

for purposes of future comprehension re the provision of this link, here is an excerpt from the blurb page:

 

Gehl adeptly uses a mix of software studies, science and technology studies, and political economy to reveal the histories and contexts of these social media sites. Looking backward at divisions of labor and the process of user labor, he provides case studies that illustrate how binary “Like” consumer choices hide surveillance systems that rely on users to build content for site owners who make money selling user data, and that promote a culture of anxiety and immediacy over depth.

Reverse Engineering Social Media also presents ways out of this paradox, illustrating how activists, academics, and users change social media for the better by building alternatives to the dominant social media sites.

 

 

ye olde net…

An article on the resurgence of ‘closed’ social media sites or ways of limiting your social media networks to *actual* friends or net acquaintances – which the writer suggests are remininiscent of old style news boards, bbs’s, and … email lists, for my money.

a short excerpt:

Rebecca Greenfield, writing for Fast Company, traces the return of the internet newsletter to the death of Google Reader. A representative from TinyLetter told her that there was an uptick in users just as Google pulled the plug last year. Some of us switched to other RSS readers, nevertheless a number of bloggers saw their community and traffic take a hit, and posted less as a result. (By the way, Aaron Straup Cope has a tool to read TinyLetters with RSS). Sara Watson told me TinyLetter is one of the sponsors for “99% invisible,” a podcast with an audience of a number of bloggers and former bloggers. There’s another reason why people are turning to newsletters to publish content now: it is a not-quite public and not-quite private way to share information.

 

anyway, one for the files:

 

 

https://medium.com/message/tiny-letters-to-the-web-we-miss-6a695a6316c

 

 

re the big data explosion

 

this post only to link to a couple of short articles discussing the recent view of big data as some kind of manna, a panacea, a means of showing what people are really thinking.. but as kate crawford points out here, some data-crunching types seem to easily fall in to the trap of thinking that correlation equals causation:

http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/04/the-hidden-biases-in-big-data/#disqus_thread

i was lead to this article via twitter and cory doctorow’s boing boing piece – where he notes that he had also written about this phenomenon in the guardian a couple of years back.

while just the other day i happened across another related piece in the sydney morning herald (link not presently available) discussing how attacks on businesses – relying on being found on the first page of a google search – render their websites virtually invisible when rival companies create codes for that page which lead to too many 404′s – causing google to remove them from their search engine hits..

online trust: that old chestnut?

every new generation needs to reinvent the wheel in some way.
below is an excerpt from an article in the WSJ on the old chestnut (for us cranky old netdynammers) of “How to tell if someone is lying to you in an email”.
you’ll note that the expert quoted on this is working for the military, and thank goodness us language experts can still get a job paid for out of tax dollars spent on defence.
but wait – why is this so old hat and ho-humifying to the likes of us over 50s?
a cursory search of the netdynam archives using, say, the term ‘trust’, will reveal that the topic was indeed thrashed almost to death back in 1996.. if my memory serves me well…

meanwhile, here’s a bit of what the article has to say on the topic:

It is possible to catch people lying because they often are bad at it, says Tyler Cohen Wood, an intelligence officer and cyber branch chief at the Defense Intelligence Agency’s Science and Technology Directorate, and author of a 2014 book titled “Catching the Catfishers: Disarm the Online Pretenders, Predators and Perpetrators Who Are Out to Ruin Your Life.” (Her views on the subject are her own and not those of her employer, she emphasizes.)

“The majority of people prefer to tell the truth,” says Ms. Cohen Wood. “That’s why when they are lying, the truth is going to leak out.”

There will be clues. To identify them, Ms. Cohen Woods suggests using a modified version of a law-enforcement technique known as statement analysis, which is a way to look for deception by analyzing a person’s words.

To begin with, pay attention to a person’s use of emphatic language. It doesn’t necessarily mean he or she is lying, but rather that he or she really wants you to believe what is being said. This is also the case when a person keeps saying the same thing over and over in slightly different ways. “They wouldn’t repeat it if it wasn’t important to them,” Ms. Cohen Wood says.

Look for language that distances the writer from the intended reader. In person, someone may unconsciously distance himself by crossing his arms in front of him. In writing, he can achieve this same effect by omitting personal pronouns and references to himself from a story.

Say he receives a text that says, “Hey I had a great time last night, did you?” He might reply, “Last night was fun.”

Another technique to watch out for is the unanswered question. You ask, and the other person hedges or changes the subject. Most likely, the person doesn’t like saying no, or doesn’t want to hurt your feelings. But he or she also may also be keeping something from you.

link to CSIRO’s computational informatics page

well worth a visit and a browse.

several projects using data-mining to gather intel on a range of natural and man-made phenomena:

http://www.csiro.au/Organisation-Structure/Divisions/Computational-Informatics.aspx

lead there by an article on one of their latest projects using emotion semantic categories (very rough to a linguist) to map reactions on twitter from tweets around the world. (see http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/life/popular-culture/mapping-the-worlds-emotions-with-twitter-20140519-38ixe.html)

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