new language annotation software

regarding a new release of ELAN, language annotation software from The Language Archive (TLA) sponsored by the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (to which i have absolutely NO affliliation):

 

by Han Sloetjes

Recently, we have released ELAN 4.7.1. It introduces some important changes to the EAF format (now version 2.8). The XML structure of controlled vocabularies is changed such that it breaks backward compatibility! Connected to these changes are new features such as multilingual controlled vocabularies and the fact that annotations now store a reference to the CV entry they are based on. Language assignment is now possible for controlled vocabularies but will be extended to the display of Metadata, Data Categories and tiers in future releases.

There is an option in the Preferences to always store in the previous version of EAF, version 2.7, for backward compatibility with previous ELAN releases. But using both ELAN 4.7.x and 4.6.2 or lower on the same files should be done with care.

Other new features are a media player based on VLC for Linux, an option for adding dependent tiers in multiple files, n-gram analysis for corpora and volume sliders for all linked audio tracks for convenient switching between the audio sources.

and a link to the download site here

 

link to CSIRO’s computational informatics page

well worth a visit and a browse.

several projects using data-mining to gather intel on a range of natural and man-made phenomena:

http://www.csiro.au/Organisation-Structure/Divisions/Computational-Informatics.aspx

lead there by an article on one of their latest projects using emotion semantic categories (very rough to a linguist) to map reactions on twitter from tweets around the world. (see http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/life/popular-culture/mapping-the-worlds-emotions-with-twitter-20140519-38ixe.html)

new apps for the new generation

the full implications of this latest app and its claims re anonymity are somewhat lost on me, but the full horrors of the video sales-pitch are not…

twitter pulse

here an analysis of twitter tweets over the past year or so using some sort of algorithm + “sentiment analysis” . it is based on local political stuff, so may not make sense to those in the USA – and also i have to annonce the rider that, not being privy to what has been used to make the algorithm, and furthermore, being extremely skeptical of anything called “sentiment analysis” that is automatically compiled, i cannot say that some of the readouts will be of any actual authenticity or believability… however, my interest lies in the use of info-graphics for rendering lots of data. as the site says, “see more. read less”.

graphing word flows

anyone come by this guy’s site yet? some good links along the side, and some nice graphic representations of speeches and twitter #words. also can insert text of one’s own and see the results – dont see any way of taking them away with us yet… but i have asked. (thanks to michele zappagvigna for the pointer)

Virtual Teams article

Jill Nemiro was recently interviewed by Vern Burkhardt on the topic of  “Virtual Teams” for IdeaConnection.com, a virtual worker’s marketplace.

Dr. Nemiro is the author of “Creativity in Virtual Teams: Key Components for Success”, and “The Handbook of High-Performance Virtual Teams”, and co-editor of “The Collaborative Work Systems Fieldbook”.  She is also Assistant Professor in Psychology and Sociology at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Her research interests are in organizational team creativity, and the virtual workplace.

She offers several insights in the following excerpt:

Read the rest of this entry »

relative affordances of blog v list: boundaries again

I’m a member of two other mailing lists which both address the same academic topics: SysFunc and SysFling. One is based in Sydney and was conceived of as being a more local venue for announcing Sydney and even Australia-based meetings, conferences, articles and so on, as well as for fielding the usual questions regarding the analysis of curly clauses. The other is based in Europe and is said to be more formal in its approach to similar concerns for systemicists. However, it is probably fair to say that most subscribers belong to both lists, and that most threads if they get going, get CCed to both lists, thus providing for a lot of overlapping.

Occasionally the beginnings of discussions are limited to one list, and then someone posts a CC to the other list as well. Those who are not members of both lists begin to wonder what is going on, but, as I say, these people are in the minority anyway.

After a recent spate of twin list activity, one of the moderators and keepers of one of these two lists, commented that amalgamation might not be a bad idea – especially in view of the fact that he was hoping to retire from list maintenance activities at the end of the year. Thereafter a slew of posts were made approving of the amalgamation – to the extent that a cry went up to the effect that perhaps any further messages on the topic be limited to those who were nay, rather than yea-sayers on the matter. A short period of silence thereafter seemed to suggest that the vote might be carried unanimously until one lone voice spoke up in favour of keeping both lists – aka nay-saying – providing affiliatory and affinity-related reasons for doing so. In other words, he cited boundary issues of the sub-grouping kind, arguing that each list has evolved their own separate identities. Thereafter, another one or two more timid types also ventured to add their nay against the groundswell of yea-sayers – but no doubt to little avail.

Read the rest of this entry »

Subscribe: Entries | Comments

Copyright © NetDynam 2.0 2017 | NetDynam 2.0 is proudly powered by WordPress and Ani World.

Proudly using Dynamic Headers by Nicasio WordPress Design