new apps for the new generation

the full implications of this latest app and its claims re anonymity are somewhat lost on me, but the full horrors of the video sales-pitch are not…

astro-turfing on the internet

a guardian article on the idea of “astro-turfing” the internet – by notable leftie sceptic, george monbiot (whose articles i admit to liking in the past).

so what does astro-turfing the internet mean?
seems as if software and big companies can get together and make it seem as if their opinion is being held by more involved identities/personas than might otherwise be the case.
a whole history, complete with identity ‘furniture’, can now be suplied so that one person can seem to be many, and maybe get paid for their time spreading their disinterested views of a reactionary nature to various sites…
my suspicious nature is ready to believe it in spades.

NYT article on web 2.0 – 3.0 privacy

here’s a well-researched and lengthy article examining the issue of privacy, and the legalities surrounding the matter of ‘identity’ in the digital age – starting with instances of employers using online searches to determine whether or not employees should keep their jobs, or even be employed in the first place. alerted to this on the email list by one of our old hands, and well worth the read.

the discussion in the article is based on the fact that we have the ability now to keep permanent records of everything everyone has ever posted or written on the internet. the article also deals with the potential of web3.0 to search and find almost anything anyone might wish to track…using new technologies such as face recognition for example….

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/25/magazine/25privacy-t2.html

superhighway to hell

recent article in “information week” plays right into my cassandra-like fears, and anxieties about the coming world-order of 1984-type double-speak. the writer, stephen saunders, apparently has some cache somehwre, although i admit having never heard of him.

mr percival dies

an iconic australian star passes away, and with him it seems, the country about which colin thiele’s book was written is also dying….

the book, storm boy, was made into a movie in the mid 1970’s. although the story featured a young boy, the main character of the book was the country. in most of the movies and books that i remember from that era,  the notion of ‘trespass’ was an underlying theme. [tom keneally’s books are also in that camp – thinking of ‘a dutiful daughter’ and ‘the chant of jimmy blacksmith’ for example – and randolph stow’s ‘merry-go-round in the sea’ in particular]. in the movie ‘storm boy’, it is the land, the coorong, which was the constant presence, the actual star.

here’s a short trailer –

the coorong, a large area of land at the end of the great murray-darling river system, a series of lakes and wetlands, deprived of water by european intervention, is dying. what was once a beautiful dry sparkling strange place filled with birdlife, turns into a sad shadow of itself.

the local indignenous people stand by helpless as their ancestral country is ruined by pastoral greed and plain ignorance.

how can we sleep while our beds are burning?

it belongs to them – let’s give it back.

the local xtian lads wrote this back in the 80’s… peter garrett front man for the oils is now being regaled by his own words, hung by his own petard…. meantime, their lyrics still resonate for us [shortly, a treatise on midnight oil and the now member for kingsford, linked to some other traditional views on oz]…

beds are burning…

do you know the dance (still?)

one of my heroes – or perhaps better, ‘role models’ – showing us how it is to be a domestic goddess…



i dont suppose there is any resemblance – in the 4 characters on stage in this clip – to any persons either living or dead? [i’ve always coyly hoped to emulate morticia, i admit….]

the dance continues in another of the clips arrayed accross the bottom (thanks to youtube functionality), and of course, afficionados will enjoy the opening theme song there too…which we all could sing, and with which we all learned to snap our fingers…

intertextual mine #2

Shintaro – Akikusa!

Toubei – the mist!

the only chopped up [scenes from my childhood in this one] offering on youtube of “The Samurai”…

….one might say that this explains my fascination with japan, but one might then be wrong…
although it may be that at some deeper level, i have absorbed the lessons of the samurai and the ninja, their codes of behaviour and their night-time practices in the righting of wrongs, these underground robin hoods of the east.

…speaking of…richard green anyone? (the opening song featuring in many episodes of our lives)

so that, when i hit japan for the first time, so many years ago now (just over 30 years ago to be precise) some subterreanean identification may have been raised in my psyche… such that i suddenly recognised – while not recognising the source of the recognition – that this was one of my real ‘homes’. thus causing me to spend the following ten years figuring out ways of getting back there to rediscover my roots.

well, at least to try to figure out what made the place tick.

of course, that can never be pinned down, but, what does happen is that in some strange way, one is after a while able to slot in, to relax and feel in place, to feel comfortable in another culture while not actually being a part of it. a strange, intoxicating, and satisfying state.

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